Assessment is intrinsic to teaching and learning, and when used effectively and skilfully, leads to our young people securing a deeper knowledge and understanding of the curriculum we deliver at The Ruth Gorse Academy.

The Assessment and Reporting systems in place at The Ruth Gorse Academy are also used across all secondary schools in The GORSE Academies Trust, therefore allowing us to analyse any data collected on a wider scale to identify strengths and areas of development to ultimately ensure our students make maximum progress. In order to achieve this, it is vital that students, along with parents and carers, fully understand their current position in each subject, are clear about why they are performing at that grade, and what they need to do to develop their knowledge and understanding further to progress to the next grade and beyond.

Target Setting

Each student is set an end of year Achievable Target Grade (ATG). Each target is based on the students’ KS2 data (SATs in reading and mathematics). For Years 8 to 11, targets are adjusted according to progress they have made since joining the academy. Additionally, in Years 9 to 11, students studying a vocational subject are set an end of KS4 Target for that subject. This target does not change for the remainder of their time at the academy.

Assessment

There are three Assessment Points for each year group during the course of the academic year. At each, teachers will use a range of evidence (classwork, homework and Iterative Tests) to decide upon a current working grade for each student – this is known as the Assessment Point grade (AP1, AP2 and AP3). Recent changes to the national landscape of assessment (removal of National Curriculum Levels in favour of scaled scores at KS2, and new, more challenging GCSE specifications at KS4) have influenced the grading system we now use in all year groups.

Students are awarded grades from 9 to 1 (with 9 being the highest grade possible at GCSE, equivalent to above an old grade A*) with added grades from a to d included to indicate students working towards a grade 1.

  • A grade 7 is aligned to an old grade A.
  • The government deems a grade 5 to be a “strong pass” at GCSE.
  • A grade 4 is aligned to an old grade C. The government deems this to be a “standard pass” at GCSE.
  • A grade 1 is aligned to an old grade G.

Each grade is divided into three sub-grades: eg. 5-, 5 and 5+.

5+ Working at the top of a grade 5, the student has mastered the skills and knowledge associated with grade 5.
5 Working in the middle of a grade 5, the student has secured the skills and knowledge associated with grade 5.
5- Working at the bottom of a grade 5, the student is developing the skills and knowledge associated with grade 5.

Reporting and Effort Grades

TGAT 11-16 Secondary Assessment System
Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11
Baseline Assessment Period
Interim Assessments AP1 Attitude to Education Level (ATEL)
Attitude to Education Focus (ATEF)
Achievable Target Grade (ATG)
Current Grade (9-d)
ATEL
ATEF
ATG
Current Grade (9-d)
Predicted Grade (9-U)
ATEL
ATEF
ATG
AP2 ATEL
ATEF
ATG
Current Grade (9-d)
ATEL
ATEF
ATG
Current Grade (9-d)
ATEL
ATEF
ATG
Current Grade (9-d)
Predicted Grade (9-U)
ATEL
ATEF
ATG
Masters Assessments AP3 Current Grade (9-d)
ATEL
ATEF
ATG
Current Grade (9-d)
Predicted Grade (9-U)
ATEL
ATEF
ATG
Current Grade (9-d)
Predicted Grade (9-U)
ATEL
ATEF
ATG
AP4 Predicted Grade (9-U)

Parents and carers will receive information as above at different Assessment Points throughout the year. Along with the targets that are set and the students’ current working grade, each student will also be awarded an Attitude to Education Level (ATEL) and an Attitude to Education Focus (ATEF). The ATEL is the level which the student is currently working at, whereas the ATEF is set to support students in securing the next level up, unless they are an outstanding learner, in which case an ATEF from the outstanding descriptors should be set. Both teachers and form tutors should adopt a best-fit approach using the descriptors below.

Attitude to Education Level Descriptors

An Outstanding Learner:

An outstanding learner exemplifies what all students aspire to achieve.  An outstanding learner displays all the qualities of a good learner and much of the following.  They:

Os1. independently take responsibility for their learning and behaviour, and know how to study effectively;
Os2. are excellent self-managers, use their own initiative and are able to apply newly acquired knowledge into bigger concepts;
Os3. lead their own learning, develop their interests and talents, and go beyond the expectations of homework set by the teacher, for example, by carrying out extra reading or research;
Os4. are resilient and go above and beyond, by actively seeking to improve the quality of their work;
Os5. participate in the wider school community, showing respect and an understanding of others;
Os6. carefully consider diverse viewpoints and utilise these to make decisions or conclusions and support others with decision making;
Os7. consistently recognise right and wrong, understand consequences and take the opportunity, where appropriate, to investigate moral and ethical issues.

A Good Learner:

A good learner is a responsible and committed student. They:

Gd1. usually take responsibility for their learning and behaviour;
Gd2. consistently try hard both inside and outside the classroom to develop detailed knowledge and skills;
Gd3. meet homework/coursework deadlines;
Gd4. are often resilient and try hard to improve the accuracy of their work;
Gd5. respond to teacher or peer feedback and ensure targets are met;
Gd6. consistently recognise right and wrong, understand consequence and when investigating moral and ethical issues offer some reasoned views;
Gd7. demonstrate an understanding of the Modern British Values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, respect and tolerance.

A Requiring Improvement learner:

A RI learner is likely to be a coasting learner who is not reaching their full potential.  They are getting the basics right but need to push themselves to fulfil the characteristics of good and outstanding learners. RI learners:

Ri1. are inconsistent in taking responsibility for their learning and behaviour;
Ri2. spend an adequate amount of time on tasks and present their work adequately;
Ri3. meet some homework/coursework deadlines;
Ri4. usually attend lessons on time and with correct equipment;
Ri5. make some contributions during discussion work;
Ri6. usually act upon feedback to improve performance;
Ri7. can identify and describe the Modern British Values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, respect and tolerance, but do not always demonstrate or exemplify these.

An Unsatisfactory learner:

An unsatisfactory learner demonstrates a poor attitude towards learning. Unsatisfactory learners:

U1. take little responsibility for their own learning and behaviour;
U2. leave work incomplete or do not complete it to an appropriate standard
U3. frequently fail to meet homework/coursework deadlines;
U4. may be late to lessons or absent for unacceptable reasons;
U5. disrupt learning of others;
U6. fail to bring appropriate equipment to lessons;
U7. fail to adequately consider different viewpoints or to demonstrate an understanding of Modern British Values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, respect and tolerance.

In addition, students receive subject-specific guidance from their teachers in the form of yellow Assessment Point Records which are in student planners. These demonstrate to students what precise skills, knowledge or understanding they need to improve upon to progress, and will also include a more generic piece of advice on how to revise or practise for that subject. Parents and carers are encouraged to review these pages with their child and discuss with them the progress they have made and how they can improve further.